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of his buddy. so beau is running in a way a lot of people run, and he is leaning at the waist. most evidence suggests this is not a good way to run. when he hits the ground, there's an impact feed, and there's a rapid rate of rise so the first peak, that's the impact peak, and that's the body slamming into >> beau is not running with natural form or good form. he's got good poise tour and maybe a lean but at the ankle and not hips and running with a high pace, about 170 to 180 steps a minute. this is what happens when he runs at a faster pace that you can see. that first one is more gradual. and we're here with professor dan. a nice day in the park. >> high pleasure. >> i'm fascinate. look at my stride and i'll come back and we'll talk about it. >> sounds great. >> all right. >> two cameras were on me so maybe that wasn't my exact gate. >> you run typically for most americans. >> that doesn't sound good. >> good poise tour but there is two things you could benefit from and the first is your cadence, the rate at which you use your legs, step frequency. >> let get an idea with cadence
. it's basically put together a picture of his body. so, beau is running in a way a lot of americans run. he's running with a typical running form. he's running with a cadence of 150 steps a minute and he's leaning at the waist. most evidence suggests this is not a very good way to run. you see when he hits the ground there's this big impact beat, it means there's a very rapid rate of rise so that first peak is what's called the impact peak and that's the body slamming into the ground really hard. beau is now running with what i would call natural running form or good form running, so he's got good posture. he's not leaning at the hips. there's a little bit of lean maybe at the ankle but not at the hitches and he's running with a very high cadence. he's running 170 to 180 steps a minute. this peak is what happened when he was running at a -- at a faster cadence without the lean. and you can see the first peak has basically disappeared or if it does appear it's very much more gradual. >> and we're here with professor dan lieberman now on a nice day in the park. thank you for being her
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2